World Famous

The project continues. It’s “world famous” now – in the sense of the art showing up at some pretty famous restaurants! In this case, a well-known place called Fran’s – located in Toronto (Ontario), Canada. If you are there for breakfast, the traditional ‘two eggs + bacon’ is a very fine choice.

The drop-off at Fran’s was down in the basement near the washrooms, and here’s a terrible photo showing the secret envelope stuck in a plant:

I’m sure someone found it, and I sure hope they enjoyed what they found. When they opened it up, they would discovered an old barn:

I like old barns. They remind me of growing up in a rural area; the sounds and sights of tractors and farm fields bring back strong memories. Old barns have so much character, and you can always see hints of colour on old barns, whether a red door, rusty roof, or faded white paint on silos. When possible, I try to peek into old barns and look up to the rafters, smell the hay, and glimpse the stalls (imagining workhorses there, making their horsy noises).

It’s always worth pulling off to the side of the road when you see a nice old barn. Take a pause, enjoy the structure, maybe take a photo or two, or maybe sketch or paint what you see. I’m pretty sure that will give you some joy.

The rural life may also remind you about having a big farmer’s breakfast, perhaps a traditional two-eggs with bacon.

Dolphin with a purpose

It’s been over a month since FoundThisArt.com started. Pieces of art have been across the globe already, and have appeared in magical places. Most recently, a dolphin had an adventure. Here’s the art:

It ended up with some relatives, on a bench at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. That’s fitting.

Apparently a few people looked at it quizzically, were intrigued, but weren’t sure they could take it. They could! They could! Finally, a women did stop, look, smile and place the piece into her purse. It made her happy, which is the purpose.

The purpose of a porpoise? First, let’s not confuse porpoises with dolphins. Sure, they are related but they are distant cousins.

I’ve seen dophins several times in my life. They are magical – swift and sleek, smart and savvy. Like so many part of the natural world, they offer inspiration, and joy. They don’t ask for much in return. Just clean water, food and space to swim and play. The least we could do is keep that in mind when we trounce about this planet with a bit too much reckless abandon.

Remember our close relatives in the seas. Remember the porpoises too.

Tree on a plane

I’m pleased to share another example of the art. This piece got to fly on a plane – how exciting! Let’s hope it finds a good home.

Trees are so special. Roots, trunk, branches and leaves: These are symbols of strength. Trees keep us sheltered, and give us oxygen, paper, firewood, buildings and more. They give us life and they provide without complaining. Think of these things when you see a tree in your town or city, or when you see them in a blur as you zip around on a train or in your car. Give some love to trees. They deserve it.

Launch!

It has started.

The first piece has been placed somewhere in a very large city. A second piece will travel on an airplane next week, and three more pieces will then make their way to at least two different countries, on at least two continents.

This is exciting!

It’s also a bit nerve-wracking – will someone find the art? Will someone share a story, and let me know the art found a good home? I told myself it didn’t matter if I heard from people or not. But if I’m to be honest, it does matter. And the main reason it matters is because I hope the art ends up somewhere, instead of in a trash can.

So, dear people of this lovely planet: keep your eye out for art. It has been shared. If it is found, let it live somewhere other than a recycle bin.

First Art

Here’s the first piece of art that will leave the studio – number one. A blue jay, seen at a bird feeder over the December break. Shimmering feathers, regal crest. Voracious in its eating habits. These corvids can clear a feeder in minutes, it seems.

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